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Philosophical Anthropology: BACKGROUND

REFERENCE & BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Definitions

philosophical anthropology:  Study of human nature conducted by the methods of philosophy. It is concerned with questions such as the status of human beings in the universe, the purpose or meaning of human life, and whether humanity can be made an object of systematic study. Among the most important works in philosophical anthropology is Being and Time (1929), by Martin Heidegger. -Britannica Concise Encyclopedia (2009)


For more information, look at the longer entries in these dictionaries and encyclopedias...

CHICAGO STYLE FOR BIBLIOGRAPHIES - IN BRIEF

Chicago Style for Bibliographies - Two Examples

Book

Example from Chicago:  Pollan, Michael. The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. New York: Penguin, 2006.

Schema:  Author. Title. Place published: Publisher, date.

Article in an online journal

Include a DOI (Digital Object Identifier) if the journal lists one. A DOI is a permanent ID that, when appended to http://dx.doi.org/ in the address bar of an Internet browser, will lead to the source. If no DOI is available, list a URL. Include an access date only if one is required by your publisher or discipline.

Example from ChicagoKossinets, Gueorgi, and Duncan J. Watts. “Origins of Homophily in an Evolving Social Network.” American Journal of Sociology 115 (2009): 405–50. Accessed February 28, 2010. doi:10.1086/599247.

Schema:  Author(s). "Article Title." Journal Title volume # (year): pages. Accessed date. DOI or URL.

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EVALUATING SOURCES

VIDEO BY REBECA BEFUS, FORMER COLBY STUDENT AND LIBRARIAN AT WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY

Evaluating Sources...

How do you know if a book or article is scholarly or reliable?

 

Consult these helpful guides... 
 

  Evaluating Sources of Information OWL at Purdue

  Tips for Evaluating Sources Diana Hacker

  Critically Analyzing Information Sources Cornell U. Library

  Sample sites for evaluation

 

 

And ask the following critical questions...

 

Accuracy
  • Can you verify the information presented using other sources like encyclopedia articles, government documents, statistical data, or primary sources?
  • Are other researchers citing this source?
Audience
  • Who is the intended audience (scholars, the general population, a specific group) ?
  • How do your research needs compare with those of the intended audience?
Authority
  • Who is responsible for the presentation of this information? (publisher, funding agency, etc.)
  • What are the author's credentials? (education, institutional affiliation, previous research, honors, etc.)
  • Is the publication from a reliable publisher? What is the domain?
Bibliography
  • What sources did the author use in preparing this presentation?
  • What is the scope of the research presented?
Bias/Objectivity 
  • Does the author offer evidence, in the form of primary and secondary sources, to support his/her assertions?
  • Is the information over-simplified and emotionally charged or logically investigated?
  • What is the author's intent? To inform, persuade, sell, entertain?
Currency
  • How is this source positioned within the current conversation surrounding your topic?
  • How does this source build upon previous schlolarship?
Depth/Coverage
  • How deeply does the author explore the subject matter?
  • Does the author meet the goals defined in the abstract or introduction?
Uniqueness
  • What will this particular source add to your research?
  • How does this source work with the other resources you will be using?
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